TINY molecule has BIG effect in childhood brain tumor studies – sometimes small things make the biggest differences

A new study by UT Health San Antonio researchers found that a molecule thousands of times smaller than a gene is able to kill medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain cancer. This tiny molecule, named MiR-584-5p, is quite efficient in its action. MiR-584-5p sensitizes the cancer to chemotherapy and radiation, making it plausible to treat … Continue reading TINY molecule has BIG effect in childhood brain tumor studies – sometimes small things make the biggest differences

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Women more prone to some chemotherapy side-effects than men

Men and women may need to be treated differently - at least when it comes to some types of cancer. In an analysis to be presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich, data was pooled from four UK randomised controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of first line chemotherapy in oesophagogastric (OG) cancer, finding significant differences … Continue reading Women more prone to some chemotherapy side-effects than men

Breast cancer patients use Twitter as a non-medical forum to share their experiences

Analysis of one week's worth of tweets about breast cancer paints mixed picture of the network's use by individuals and institutions. Twitter is a place where many cancer patients go to share and discuss their experiences of the disease. This is the main finding of a recent exploratory study, to be presented at the ESMO … Continue reading Breast cancer patients use Twitter as a non-medical forum to share their experiences

New method promises fewer side effects from cancer drugs

A recent achievement in the field of protein research allows for better tailored pharmaceuticals with fewer side effects; the method was developed by two University of Copenhagen researchers. Protein research is one of the hottest areas in medical research because proteins make it possible to develop far more effective pharmaceuticals for the treatment of diabetes, … Continue reading New method promises fewer side effects from cancer drugs

Anti-inflammatory use during surgery could improve cancer outcomes

The world’s first clinical trial (SURGUVANT) evaluating anti-inflammatory use at the time of surgery in colon cancer patients to improve their cancer outcome has been published in the scientific journal, BMC Cancer. The research successfully tested an anti-inflammatory agent with anti-cancer properties known as ‘Taurolidine’ in the SURGUVANT trial which was funded by a grant from … Continue reading Anti-inflammatory use during surgery could improve cancer outcomes

Cancer care and sleep resource guide

Stephanie Linder and colleagues at Sleep Help are devoted to increasing sleep health awareness and wellness. They  have  been working on a useful resource all about how patients in cancer treatment and remission can deal with the sleep-disrupting side effects of chemotherapy, steroids, and other treatments. It can be found here: https://www.sleephelp.org/cancer-sleep/

Dental care may benefit patients scheduled for cancer surgery

Preoperative oral care by a dentist may help reduce postoperative complications in patients who undergo cancer surgery, according to a new British Journal of Surgery study. Of 509,179 patients studied, 16% received preoperative oral care from a dentist. When a surgeon requested that a dentist provide preoperative oral care to a patient with cancer, the dentist checked … Continue reading Dental care may benefit patients scheduled for cancer surgery

Biomarkers link fatigue in cancer to fatigue in Parkinson’s

Biological markers responsible for extreme exhaustion in patients with cancer have now been linked to fatigue in those with Parkinson's disease, according to new research from Rice University. ​ "Inflammation and fatigue in early, untreated Parkinson's disease" will appear in an upcoming edition of Acta NeurologicaScandinavica. It is one of the first studies to link the … Continue reading Biomarkers link fatigue in cancer to fatigue in Parkinson’s

Testosterone research brings new hope for cancer patients with weight loss

Many cancer patients suffer from a loss of body mass known as cachexia. Approximately 20 percent of cancer-related deaths are attributed to the syndrome of cachexia, which in cancer patients is often characterized by a rapid or severe loss of fat and skeletal muscle. Dr. Melinda Sheffield-Moore, professor and head of the Department of Health … Continue reading Testosterone research brings new hope for cancer patients with weight loss

Smell receptors in the body could help sniff out disease

A review of more than 200 studies reveals that olfactory receptors--proteins that bind to odors that aid the sense of smell--perform a wide range of mostly unknown functions outside the nose. The function of extra-nasal olfactory receptors has the potential to be used in the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions such as cancer. The article is … Continue reading Smell receptors in the body could help sniff out disease