Cancer patients rarely demand unnecessary tests and treatments

Physicians often blame patient demands for contributing to high medical costs, however, a new study involving more than 5,000 patient-clinician visits indicates that cancer patients rarely push for unnecessary tests and treatments from their health care providers. The study, conducted by Ezekiel Emanuel, MD, PhD and colleagues in the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman … Continue reading Cancer patients rarely demand unnecessary tests and treatments

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Young adult survivors most distressed after leukemia and lymphoma treatment

Two University of Colorado Cancer Center studies published in the¬†Journal of Psychosocial Oncology¬†show that young adult survivors (ages 18-39) of leukemia and lymphoma are more likely to report high distress than older survivors (ages 65+). Specifically, 45 percent of younger patients report moderate-to-high distress, whereas only 18 percent of older patients report similarly elevated levels. … Continue reading Young adult survivors most distressed after leukemia and lymphoma treatment

One-two punch catches cancer cells in vulnerable state

Timing may be decisive when it comes to overcoming cancer's ability to evade treatment. By hitting breast cancer cells with a targeted therapeutic immediately after chemotherapy, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) were able to target cancer cells during a transitional stage when they were most vulnerable, killing cells and shrinking tumors in the … Continue reading One-two punch catches cancer cells in vulnerable state

Twelve-year study suggests procedures to prevent cervical cancer do not affect fertility

Common surgical procedures used to diagnose and treat precancerous cervical lesions do not decrease women's chances of becoming pregnant, according to a study that followed nearly 100,000 women for up to 12 years. To the contrary, researchers found that women who had one of these procedures were actually more likely to become pregnant than women … Continue reading Twelve-year study suggests procedures to prevent cervical cancer do not affect fertility