New colon cancer culprit found in gut microbiome

Changes in the gut bacteria of colon cancer patients indicate that some virulent bacteria could be linked to the progression of the disease, according to research published in the open access journal Genome Medicine. The findings could eventually be used to identify a virulence signature in these cancers and help doctors predict how bacterial changes in … Continue reading New colon cancer culprit found in gut microbiome

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Smoking may impact survival after a breast cancer diagnosis

Researchers have found that smoking may increase the risk of dying early in premenopausal women with breast cancer. In a prospective study of 848 women with breast cancer who were followed for a median of 6.7 years, premenopausal women who smoked for more than 21.5 years had a 3.1-times higher risk of dying from any … Continue reading Smoking may impact survival after a breast cancer diagnosis

Cancer overtakes cardiovascular disease as UK’s No. 1 killer – but only among men

Cardiovascular disease still primary cause of death among women Cancer has overtaken cardiovascular disease, which includes heart disease and stroke, as the UK's No 1 killer- but only among men, reveals research published online in the journal Heart. Cardiovascular disease is still the most common cause of death among women, and kills more young women than breast … Continue reading Cancer overtakes cardiovascular disease as UK’s No. 1 killer – but only among men

Intravenous nutrition source could reduce side effects of chemotherapy

Carnegie Mellon researchers show that Intralipid can also increase the effectiveness of cancer-fighting nanodrugs. A single dose of an FDA-approved intravenous nutrition source may be able to significantly reduce the toxicity and increase the bioavailability of platinum-based cancer drugs, according to a study by Carnegie Mellon University biologists published in Scientific Reports. Platinum-based drugs, including cisplatin, … Continue reading Intravenous nutrition source could reduce side effects of chemotherapy

Benefit of surgery for ductal carcinoma in-situ investigated

Study finds that breast surgery offers less survival benefit for low-grade DCIS patientsIn a study published in JAMA Surgery, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) report that breast surgery performed at or shortly after a diagnosis of low-grade ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) did not significantly change patients' survival rate. The team finds that the survival rate … Continue reading Benefit of surgery for ductal carcinoma in-situ investigated