New study finds black women have higher frequency of BRCA mutations than previously reported

The higher BRCA mutation frequency in young black women may contribute to higher rates of aggressive breast cancer Women who have inherited mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes are more likely to develop breast cancer or ovarian cancer, especially at a younger age. Approximately 5 percent of women with breast cancer in the United … Continue reading New study finds black women have higher frequency of BRCA mutations than previously reported

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Longer colonoscopies linked to lower cancer rate

If a colonoscopy seems like the type of thing you'd like to get done with quickly, think again. Research by a Veterans Affairs team has confirmed that longer-lasting colonoscopies are associated with lower cancer rates.The findings appear online in the journal Gastroenterology. They were based on nearly 77,000 screening colonoscopies. Experts already know about the link between … Continue reading Longer colonoscopies linked to lower cancer rate

Pancreas cancer spreads from multiple types of wayward cells

Penn animal study has implications for better drug design, 'unprecedented window' into tumor evolution. Tumor cells associated with pancreatic cancer often behave like communities by working with each other to increase tumor spread and growth to different organs. Groups of these cancer cells are better than single cancer cells in driving tumor spread, according to … Continue reading Pancreas cancer spreads from multiple types of wayward cells

Combining chemotherapy with an immune-blocking drug could stop cancer growing back

Giving patients a drug that blocks part of the immune system from going into overdrive might help prevent cancer coming back in some people, according to research published today in Cancer Research. Cancer Research UK-funded scientists from the University of Sheffield found that the cancer-killing action of chemotherapy can trigger a swarm of wound-healing, white blood … Continue reading Combining chemotherapy with an immune-blocking drug could stop cancer growing back